Category Archives: ADCS FATCA Lawsuit

Extradition Is One Way That Changes In Another Country’s Tax Laws May Change Your Tax Relationship With The US

Prologue

As long as the US continues to employ citizenship taxation any changes in US tax law will continue to have unintended consequences on Americans abroad. In March of 2022 I outlined how some of the tax changes proposed in the 2023 Biden Green book would impact US citizens who live outside the United States. As important as US tax changes are, Americans abroad must be aware of how changes in the laws of their country of residence may also impact their “tax relationship” with the United States.

The purpose of this post is provide five simple examples. Some of the examples are based on Canada’s tax laws and others are of a more general nature.

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Federal Court Of Appeal Upholds Trial Decision Ruling Canada/US FATCA IGA Is Constitutional

Circa 2014

In June of 2014 the plaintiffs in the ADCS (“Alliance For The Defence Of Canadian Sovereignty”) lawsuit launched their legal challenge to the constitutionality of the Canada US FATCA IGA. The proceedings have gone through a Federal Court hearing in 2015, a second Federal Court hearing in 2019 and the Federal Court Of Appeal hearing in 2022. It has been a “long haul” and the plaintiffs (Ginny, Gwen and Kazia) – true unsung heroes in life – deserve the thanks of all Canadians.

On September 21, 2022 the Federal Court of Appeal dismissed the appeal from the trial decision (which ruled against the plaintiffs).

In other words, the US FATCA law continues to be endorsed by the Canadian courts as being the law of Canada too.

Every human being is a minority somewhere. US citizens living outside the United States are a minority wherever they live. Furthermore, because of FATCA (the tool to enforce citizenship taxation) they will ALWAYS have fewer rights than others in their country of residence. What is astounding is that the United States is ensuring that it’s own citizens are subject to discrimination! Such are the effects of citizenship taxation.

The advancement and protection of the rights of minority groups is always a marathon and not a sprint. It requires the relentless dedication to the goal of achieving justice. At this moment I would like to recognize and thank Patricia Moon, Carol Tapanila and Stephen Kish for their tremendous efforts, personal sacrifices and focus on this cause.

It’s also important and appropriate to recognize the support of the hundreds of anonymous people who contributed financially (in some cases their pension payments) and in other cases their encouragement that this legal challenge was necessary.

The next decision is whether to seek leave to appeal to the Supreme Court Of Canada.

I will write more about this in the next few days. What follows is a copy of the decision.

A-370-19_20220921_R_E_O_OTT_20220921132516

Those wishing to better understand the history, purpose and progression of this lawsuit might go here:

https://adcsovereignty.wordpress.com/the-summary-trial-book-of-posts/

John Richardson Follow me on Twitter @Expatriationlaw

@ADCSovereignty #FATCA Appeal – March 30, 2022 – Reporting On The Hearing In Twitter Time

As reported by American Expat Finance and the Isaac Brock Society, the ADCS-ADSC.ca FATCA appeal was heard on March 30, 2022.

As I watched the hearing I tweeted my thoughts. Win, lose or draw the goal is to get the case before the Supreme Court of Canada. Therefore, today’s appeal should be seen as an important step down that road.

I suggest that you:

1. Read this summary of the ADCS FATCA lawsuit to understand the context

2. Read this article from a Canadian law firm which references the FATCA lawsuit

3. Read the article at American Expat Finance

4. Click on the link below to see my thoughts and observations as the hearing unfolded.

https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1509210940167892997?refresh=1648676869

In addition, a bit more history on this lawsuit …

John Richardson – Follow me on Twitter @Expatriatonlaw

Could The November 3, 2020 US Election Be Decided By Canadian Residents With US/CDN Dual Citizenship?

Introduction

A recent opinion piece published at CBC included:

I have been walking around these days asking myself with only half a smile whether there is some morphed version of the Canadian national anthem which declares: “True expatriate love in all thy sons and daughters command.”

I am doing this because I have been regularly experiencing what you might call expatriate shaming.

There’s been a push — no, make that a shove — to recruit Americans living in Canada who are eligible to vote in the Nov. 3 presidential election to become part of the electoral process. Knowing I was born in the U.S., my friends, neighbours and relatives will ask with a semi-desperate twinge in their voices: “Have you registered to vote in the U.S. election?” And when I say I am registered but I do not plan to vote, they get very angry.

Given what has been going on under President Donald Trump, they exclaim, how can I even think about not making a difference by casting a presidential ballot? (By the way, no one assumes that an expat could possibly vote for Trump, which is interesting.)

https://www.cbc.ca/news/opinion/opinion-expats-canada-presidential-election-vote-1.5750417

The VoteFromAbroad.org Push To Get “US Citizens” (Whoever They May Be) Living In Canada To Vote

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Ongoing Updates: Compilation of legal challenges against FATCA And The CRS

The automatic exchange of information under FATCA and the CRS have defined tax administration in the 21st Century. At the risk of over generalization:

FATCA: The United States requests information about individuals (that include the tax residents) of the IGA partner country be sent to the United States. In other words: information is transferred from a country where people do live to a country where they don’t live.

CRS: Countries request information from a country where the individual is NOT tax resident to the country where they are tax resident.

Collectively, FATCA and CRS are referred to as AEOI. There have been and continue to be challenges to both CRS and FATCA. These challenges have arisen in different countries and are based on FATCA and CRS violating the laws/constitutions of those countries.

A list of these challenges includes:

FATCA Related Challenges

1. The Republicans Overseas FATCA Legal Action Lawsuit

Basis of lawsuit: Primarily based on the claim that FATCA violates various U.S. constitutional provisions (including 4th Amendment – unreasonable search and seizure).

Status: Dismissed in the U.S.Courts because the plaintiffs lacked standing. None of the issues were ever argued on the merits.

Twitter: @FATCALawuit

2. FATCA Canada – Alliance For The Canadian Sovereignty FATCA lawsuit

Basis of lawsuit: This is a lawsuit in the Federal Court of Canada against the Government of Canada alleging that the FATCA IGAs violates Sections 8, 7 and 15 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. It also includes the claim that the FATCA IGA cannot be justified under the provisions of the Canada U.S. Tax Treaty.

Status: The plaintiffs lost at trial in the Federal Court. The decision is being appealed to the Federal Court of Appeal.

Twitter: @ADCSovereignty

3. Association of French Accidental Americans

Basis of lawsuit: The plaintiffs argued that FATCA infringes the privacy rights of Accidental Americans and the the FATCA IGA could not be sustained because of a lack of U.S. reciprocity. Note that this case introduces the notion of “privacy rights” directly into the argument.

Status: Lost

Twitter: @USAccidental

4. Jenny’s Crowd Funded U.K. FATCA lawsuit

Basis of lawsuit: The U.S., Canadian and French lawsuits were primarily based on violations of entrenched constitutional rights. This U.K. based lawsuit is based on the claim that because the FATCA demands are disproportionate that FATCA conflicts with the (relatively) new GDPR. The GDPR has given the U.K. plaintiffs an avenue of attack that has not been available in the U.S. or Canadian FATCA lawsuits.

Status: In the process of being funded.

Twitter: @CrossBriton